WW2 Military Relic Hunting in Estonia

Then more interesting relics, such as buttons and an aluminum container, began to appear - this suggested that whoever metal detected here, they used nothing but a deep-seeker which would pick up only targets of a size larger than a beer can. The military relic hunters were looking for weapons.

Plain Button with Piece of Clothing Still Attached

Plain Button with Piece of Clothing Attached

WW2 German Aluminum Container

WW2 German Aluminum Container

A friend of mine Thorsten in Bavaria helped me in identification of this aluminum container. In his e-mail he wrote:
"I think the inscription of the aluminum container reads "Günther & Haussner AG, Chemnitz." Chemnitz is a city in Saxonia in Eastern Germany. A chemical company Günther & Haussner AG existed until 1948."

"Günther & Haussner A. G. Chemnitz"

Clenther & Haussner A. G. Chem No174

A pile of large iron finds was left by the military diggers near the foundation. I could imagine how much sweat they broke digging up every "big" signal. And the amount of remaining smaller junk targets was still endless.

A Pile of Dug Iron Junk

A Pile of Dug Iron Junk

I did not want to "disable" myself by digging a zillion of splinters, bolts and screws, so I looked around again and spotted a nice metal detecting spot - under the branches of firs, which blocked the sunlight coming down to the ground, thus preventing the grass from growing.

That was the rightmost decision made. The first signal I got was a coin-like one. Finally I dug up a coin!

Copper Coin Found

Copper Coin Found

The coin was not in great condition, but I could see its design and determine that it was a coin minted in Finland.

Finnish Coin

Finnish Coin


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